Duerr’s Raises £40K With Tutti Fruiti Ball

Tutti Fruiti, you beauty – Wythenshawe jam and preserve maker Duerr’s has raised an amazing £40,000 for charity at its annual themed ball.

The money was raised at the Tutti Fruiti 1950s themed evening held at The Mere resort in Cheshire last month, with funds going to The Joshua Tree charity.

A packed room of 350 plus guests – many in fancy dress – enjoyed an evening of all things 1950s rock ‘n’ roll, with more than a few nods towards Duerr’s own fruity jams and marmalades.

Hosted by radio presenter Mark Radcliffe, patron of The Joshua Tree, guests dug deep for a variety of money-can’t-buy auction and raffle prizes.

Reflecting on the success of the 18th charity ball held by the company, director of marketing, (Little) Richard Duerr, says: “We’re blown away by the success of the ball yet again.

“We would like to thank our extended family of friends, colleagues and suppliers for continuing to support us and our charity efforts.

“We chose The Joshua Tree charity this year, which helps families in the North West affected by childhood cancer. They are reliant on donations from the public to be able to offer their services free of charge to the 80 families and growing, who access their services during an incredibly traumatic time. All the money raised from the ball will go towards helping them continue their amazing work.”

Joshua Hill, who the charity is named after, was at the ball with his parents Lynda and David. David says: “Every penny raised will make a massive difference to families going through the experience of childhood cancer. We would like to say a massive thank you to Duerr’s and everyone who attended and supported the ball – it was a brilliant night.”

Duck Casserole

Winter calls for hearty home cooked meals! We love Nigel Slater’s duck casserole, but with an added dollop of Duerr’s marmalade – why not try it for yourself. Full recipe is below. Enjoy!

A casserole of duck with turnips and orange

This is not the classic duck with orange sauce, but a mildly spiced casserole. The orange should not dominate, and the flavour can be tweaked to your taste at the end with lemon juice or, better still, a bitter Seville orange. Serves 3.

groundnut or vegetable oil
a large duck cut into 6
250g smoked bacon
2 medium to large onions
4 smallish turnips
a 3cm lump of ginger (about 50g)
1 litre of light stock (water at a push)
the juice of 2 large sweet oranges
3 bay leaves
a stick of cinnamon
2 star anise flowers
2-3 tbsp of Duerr’s marmalade
the juice of a lemon or Seville orange

To serve:
rice, couscous, cracked wheat or quinoa

Warm a little oil in a heavy-based casserole and lightly brown the pieces of duck in it, two or three pieces at a time. Drain them and set aside on kitchen paper. Cut the bacon into thick strips and add to the pan, letting them crisp lightly in the fat. Remove them and add to the duck. Meanwhile, peel and roughly chop the onions.

Pour off all but 2 tablespoons of the fat in the pan, then add the onions and cook over a moderate to low heat, stirring occasionally. As the onions cook, peel and roughly chop the turnips and add them. Cut the ginger into fine matchsticks, then add to the pan.

Once the onions have well and truly softened and are starting to turn pale gold, add stock and orange juice, the bay leaves, cinnamon stick and the star anise, a generous grinding of salt and some black pepper. Return the duck pieces to the pan, turn down to a slow simmer and leave for 45 minutes.

Check the duck for tenderness. It should be soft, but far from falling off the bone. Put the pan to one side and let it cool (overnight if possible). Scoop off as much fat as you can and discard it.

Bring the pan back up to simmering point. Stir in the marmalade, then correct the seasoning with salt, pepper and the juice of the lemon (or bitter orange if you have one). The flavours should be warm, sweetly spiced and with the gentlest hint of marmalade.

Bonfire Night Tips For Dogs

Make sure your Fireworks Night is a happy one for your furry friend too with these tips from the Kennel Club to keep them calm…

Do:

  • Acclimatise your dog to noises prior to the big night. There are many noise CDs on the market which give you the opportunity to introduce your dog to a variety of potentially disturbing noises in a controlled manner.
  • Seek help from an experienced animal behaviourist. If your pet is severely noise phobic, sound CDs may make the situation worse.
  • Make a safe den for your dog to retreat to if he or she feels scared. Alternatively, let your dog take refuge under furniture and include an old, unwashed piece of clothing like a woolly jumper so that your dog can smell your scent and feel comfortable.
  • Distract your dog from the noise by having the TV or the radio switched on.
  • Try to act and behave as normal, as your dog will pick up on any odd behaviour. Remain calm, happy and cheerful as this will send positive signals to your dog. Reward calm behaviour with dog treats or playing with toys of interest.
  • Check where and when firework displays are being held in your local area. Also ask your neighbours to let you know if they are planning anything.
  • Consult your vet if your dog has any health problems or is taking any medication before giving remedies to help him cope with fireworks night, and always follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Feed your dog a while before you expect any disturbances, as once the fireworks start your dog may be too anxious to eat.
  • Walk your dog before dusk. It may be some time before it’s safe to venture outside again for your dog to relieve himself.
  • Make sure you shut all doors and windows in your home and don’t forget to draw the curtains. This will block out any scary flashes of light and reduce the noise level of fireworks. Don’t forget to block off cat flaps to stop dogs (and cats) escaping.
  • Shut your dog safely inside a room before opening the front door.
  • Your dog might choose to hide under the bed; if he or she comes to you for comfort, make sure that you give it to him/her. Ignoring your dog would only make things worse as he or she wouldn’t understand your withdrawal from them.
  • Keep a collar and ID tag on your dog, just in case they do accidentally escape. Make sure your dog is microchipped too, as if he or she does escape without a collar on this will ensure you are reunited as quickly as possible and is a legal requirement.

Don’t:

  • Take your dog to a firework display, even if your dog does not bark or whimper, don’t assume he or she is happy. Excessive yawning and panting can indicate that your dog is stressed.
  • Tie your dog up outside while fireworks are being let off.
  • Assume your garden is escape proof. If your dog needs to go out keep him on a lead just in case.
  • Leave your dog on his own or in a separate room from you.
  • Try to force your dog to face his fears – he’ll just become more frightened.
  • Forget to top up the water bowl. Anxious dogs pant more and get thirsty.
  • Change routines more than necessary, as this can be stressful for some dogs.
  • Try and tempt him out if he does retreat, as this may cause more stress.
  • Tell your dog off. This will only make your pet more distressed. It is important to remember that it is natural for a dog to be scared of loud noises and unfamiliar sights and sounds.